Omicron: Shun Cloth Masks To Keep COVID-19 At Bay, Check Details

The Omicron variant has left all its predecessors far behind when it comes to spreading.

Masks too have been an important tool to shield ourselves from being exposed to the coronavirus.
Masks too have been an important tool to shield ourselves from being exposed to the coronavirus.

The Omicron variant of the COVID-19 has already been considered to be the main driving force behind the third wave of coronavirus. As this is a relatively new variant, researchers and scientists are still trying to figure out the best possible ways to protect from it. However, experts have advised that vaccination still remains the best shield against the highly contagious Omicron. Masks too have been an important tool to shield ourselves from being exposed to the coronavirus. But we need to realize that the right choice of face mask is very crucial to be safe during the imminent third wave. Experts have suggested that cloth masks are not enough to keep you protected.

Why cloths masks are not enough?

The Omicron variant has left all its predecessors far behind when it comes to spreading. This variant of the COVID-19 is spreading much faster than even the Delta variant. This is why wearing a proper face mask is extremely crucial. According to researchers, the best mask to use still remains the N95 mask.

Medical analyst Dr Leana Wen told CNN that ‘cloth masks are just little more than facial decorations. So it is time to ditch all the cloth masks that you have accumulated over the past couple of months – unless you would like to double them up with a surgical or N95 mask.

Why N95 masks over cloth masks?

Materials like cotton are often used to make cloth masks. Cotton is not known to be protective enough against particles that carry the COVID-19 virus – or in the current situation Omicron. As Omicron is highly infectious, wearing cloth masks may become a problem.

On the other hand, the N95 mask is made of several layers of synthetic material which are capable of capturing around 95 per cent of tiny 0.3-micron particles in the air.

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