COVID-19 Loses 90 Per Cent Ability To Infect Within Minutes In Air: Study

They gently levitate those particles between two electric rings for anywhere between five seconds to 20 minutes.

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There are several things that we are still not aware of Coronavirus. This is because the disease is relatively new and there are several studies that are still underway to understand it. A new study on the Coronavirus has found that the disease loses 90 per cent of its ability to infect people within 20 minutes of becoming airborne. The study found this will simulate how the virus survives in the air.

The researcher was conducted at the University of Bristol. Researchers developed an apparatus to produce tiny virus-containing particles. They gently levitate those particles between two electric rings for anywhere between five seconds to 20 minutes. During this period, they controlled the surrounding temperature, humidity, and UV light intensity.

Researchers found that as the viral particles leave the relatively moist and carbon dioxide-rich conditions of the lungs, they rapidly lose water and dry out. They also found the transition to lower levels of carbon dioxide is associated with a rapid increase in pH.

The rate of degradation is dependent on the relative humidity of the surrounding air. When humidity was less than 50 per cent, the virus lost around half of its infectivity within five seconds, and a further 19 per cent loss over the next five minutes.

“At 90 per cent humidity, the virus lost 52 per cent of infectivity after five minutes and further dropped to about 10 per cent after 20 minutes,” the study said.

“People have been focused on poorly ventilated spaces and thinking about airborne transmission over metres or across a room. I’m not saying that doesn’t happen, but I think still the greatest risk of exposure is when you’re close to someone,” said professor Jonathan Reid, director of the University of Bristol’s Aerosol Research Centre and the study’s lead author.

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